AEC


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ariel esteban cayer


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Fringe, 4x15: “A Short Story About Love” (2012)
Forsaking past incarnations of characters for the sake of a rebooted timeline is, like in comics, an immensely tricky affair. The 4th season has suffered from it immensely, dragging us into a deplorable “back-to-basics” approach where everything is to be re-learnt and re-interpreted for the umpteenth time. This being one of two already well-established, and now seemingly forgotten, timelines, namely the so-called “Blueverse” and “Redverse”, the fourth season (Yellowverse?) has, as a result, felt incredibly repetitive and circular.
Had this rebooting given the show runners an excuse for increased inventivity (as the introduction of a single parallel universe did back in the second season and well into the third), the 4th season would be the show’s best. Instead, “A Short Story About Love” hinted at possibility for the potential season endgame to be further retreading, once again establishing Peter and Olivia’s relationship as the core concern of all timelines. After reintroducing a past villain in the previous episodes (granted, the excellent Jarred Harris as of Mad Men fame as David Robert Jones), the show goes as far as offering a parallel version of a case seen in the first season (1x13: “The Transformation”) in the episode following this one — which is a good idea in theory, but a rather tedious exercise in practice.
I will not get into the Observer’s heavy-handed expositional speech (above), simply stating that the idiom “home is where the heart is” was essentially “A Short Story About Love“‘s underlying lesson. While I might be speaking ahead of myself here (having what are supposed to be 7 particularly pivotal post-hiatus episodes to watch next), it also raises some concerns: have the show’s writers, Wyman, Pinkner, Chappelle an co., completely abandoned the prime timeline for the sake of a revised, if only slightly bizarro version, of characters we have seen grow and love alongside each other? If so, is this narrative tangent’s sole purpose to make the show all about Peter Bishop’s ballads across the multiverse — and how that affects his relationship(s) with Olive?
I have held back from getting entirely invested in this new iteration of the show’s reality in the hopes of eventually getting back to the Blueverse, but at this point, I might very well have to come to the realization that it might unfortunately never happen. Whether the show will know to bring this incarnation, so to speak, to a satisfying endgame remains to  be seen, as I suspect a final change of paradigm to occur by this season’s end. More on this, as I finish the season and get into the final one.

Fringe, 4x15: “A Short Story About Love” (2012)

Forsaking past incarnations of characters for the sake of a rebooted timeline is, like in comics, an immensely tricky affair. The 4th season has suffered from it immensely, dragging us into a deplorable “back-to-basics” approach where everything is to be re-learnt and re-interpreted for the umpteenth time. This being one of two already well-established, and now seemingly forgotten, timelines, namely the so-called “Blueverse” and “Redverse”, the fourth season (Yellowverse?) has, as a result, felt incredibly repetitive and circular.

Had this rebooting given the show runners an excuse for increased inventivity (as the introduction of a single parallel universe did back in the second season and well into the third), the 4th season would be the show’s best. Instead, “A Short Story About Love” hinted at possibility for the potential season endgame to be further retreading, once again establishing Peter and Olivia’s relationship as the core concern of all timelines. After reintroducing a past villain in the previous episodes (granted, the excellent Jarred Harris as of Mad Men fame as David Robert Jones), the show goes as far as offering a parallel version of a case seen in the first season (1x13: “The Transformation”) in the episode following this one — which is a good idea in theory, but a rather tedious exercise in practice.

I will not get into the Observer’s heavy-handed expositional speech (above), simply stating that the idiom “home is where the heart is” was essentially “A Short Story About Love“‘s underlying lesson. While I might be speaking ahead of myself here (having what are supposed to be 7 particularly pivotal post-hiatus episodes to watch next), it also raises some concerns: have the show’s writers, Wyman, Pinkner, Chappelle an co., completely abandoned the prime timeline for the sake of a revised, if only slightly bizarro version, of characters we have seen grow and love alongside each other? If so, is this narrative tangent’s sole purpose to make the show all about Peter Bishop’s ballads across the multiverse — and how that affects his relationship(s) with Olive?

I have held back from getting entirely invested in this new iteration of the show’s reality in the hopes of eventually getting back to the Blueverse, but at this point, I might very well have to come to the realization that it might unfortunately never happen. Whether the show will know to bring this incarnation, so to speak, to a satisfying endgame remains to  be seen, as I suspect a final change of paradigm to occur by this season’s end. More on this, as I finish the season and get into the final one.

Fringe, 4x14: “The End of All Things” (2012)

Fringe, 4x14: “The End of All Things” (2012)

Fringe, 4x13: “A Better Human Being” (2012)

Fringe, 4x13: “A Better Human Being” (2012)

Fringe, 4x12: “Welcome to Westfield” (2012)

Fringe, 4x12: “Welcome to Westfield” (2012)

Fringe, 4x11: “Making Angels” (2012)
While I hear it gets worse in the next season, it is so nice to see Astrid (played by the wonderful Jasika Nicole, which you can follow on Tumblr right here) get a little sliver of a spotlight in this (so far) quite underwhelming 4th season. “Making Angels” is about a lot of things (saviors, angels, collapsing past, present and future), yet all of which is unexpectedly framed but the heartwarming story of both versions of Astrid meeting each other and bonding over differences in skill, personality and life experiences — AltAstrid being an autistic-spectrum pre-cog statistics genius whose father died at a young age while Prime Astrid (or Third Timeline Astrid/AltPrime Astrid, whichever way you choose to look at it) is the balanced, quirky and charming individual we have come to know and love on the show, and whose father is, by the end, revealed to be loving…and alive.
It’s simple and touching, yet bittersweet as it mainly serves as a poignant reminder of how criminally underused her character has become, once upon a time (see: the first season) a more integral part of the Fringe team that has slowly devolved into the simple foil to the comedy and lab antics of Walter Bishop (John Noble) — something that many, including Nicole herself, have decried and commented on. With a handful of episodes left to the final season (which I’m relentlessly making my way to, as you can probably tell), I can only hope her character gets a few other worthwhile screen moments. In the meantime, I’ll take what I can get from a season that, shall it be said, has other bigger problems to complain about — and which I’ll make the effort to write about at a later date. 

Fringe, 4x11: “Making Angels” (2012)

While I hear it gets worse in the next season, it is so nice to see Astrid (played by the wonderful Jasika Nicole, which you can follow on Tumblr right here) get a little sliver of a spotlight in this (so far) quite underwhelming 4th season. “Making Angels” is about a lot of things (saviors, angels, collapsing past, present and future), yet all of which is unexpectedly framed but the heartwarming story of both versions of Astrid meeting each other and bonding over differences in skill, personality and life experiences — AltAstrid being an autistic-spectrum pre-cog statistics genius whose father died at a young age while Prime Astrid (or Third Timeline Astrid/AltPrime Astrid, whichever way you choose to look at it) is the balanced, quirky and charming individual we have come to know and love on the show, and whose father is, by the end, revealed to be loving…and alive.

It’s simple and touching, yet bittersweet as it mainly serves as a poignant reminder of how criminally underused her character has become, once upon a time (see: the first season) a more integral part of the Fringe team that has slowly devolved into the simple foil to the comedy and lab antics of Walter Bishop (John Noble) — something that many, including Nicole herself, have decried and commented on. With a handful of episodes left to the final season (which I’m relentlessly making my way to, as you can probably tell), I can only hope her character gets a few other worthwhile screen moments. In the meantime, I’ll take what I can get from a season that, shall it be said, has other bigger problems to complain about — and which I’ll make the effort to write about at a later date. 

Fringe, 4x10: “Forced Perspective” (2012)

Fringe, 4x10: “Forced Perspective” (2012)

Fringe, 4x09: “Enemy of my Enemy” (2012)

Fringe, 4x09: “Enemy of my Enemy” (2012)

Fringe, 4x08: “Back to Where You’ve Never Been” (2012)

Fringe, 4x08: “Back to Where You’ve Never Been” (2012)

Fringe, 4x07: “Wallflower” (2011)

Fringe, 4x07: “Wallflower” (2011)

Fringe, 4x06: “And Those We’ve Left Behind” (2011)

Fringe, 4x06: “And Those We’ve Left Behind” (2011)

Fringe, 4x05: “Novation” (2011)

Fringe, 4x05: “Novation” (2011)

Fringe, 4x04: “Subject 9” (2011)

Fringe, 4x04: “Subject 9” (2011)

Fringe, 4x03: “Alone in the World” (2011)

Fringe, 4x03: “Alone in the World” (2011)

Fringe, 4x02: “One Night in October” (2011)

Fringe, 4x02: “One Night in October” (2011)

Sightseers (Ben Wheatley, 2012)
Wheatley’s new film, following last year’s highly acclaimed Kill List, is a hugely entertaining and darkly comedic road movie, blending absurd horror, subtle humor and hysterical romance with a large body count. Beautifully photographed (making great use of the Northern England scenery), Sightseers also comes recommended if you’ve enjoyed quirky and bleak British comedies in the vein of last year’s Black Pond, or the films of Edgar Wright — who serves as executive producer on this picture.

Sightseers (Ben Wheatley, 2012)

Wheatley’s new film, following last year’s highly acclaimed Kill List, is a hugely entertaining and darkly comedic road movie, blending absurd horror, subtle humor and hysterical romance with a large body count. Beautifully photographed (making great use of the Northern England scenery), Sightseers also comes recommended if you’ve enjoyed quirky and bleak British comedies in the vein of last year’s Black Pond, or the films of Edgar Wright — who serves as executive producer on this picture.