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ariel esteban cayer


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The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012)

"As always with Anderson, the character opposition borders on the schematic, and the structure threatens to come apart at the seams. But the courting of danger is exactly what makes his films so exciting, this new film most of all. I don’t think he has ever done a better job of resolving his story, perhaps because he has come to terms with the irresolution within and between his characters. Freddie will always be Dodd’s guarantor of authenticity, and his bête noire as he tries to establish his financial empire. Dodd will always loom as Freddie’s savior and his greatest “enabler.” One imagines an eternal return: re-emerging from the lost to go Clear only to escape back to the lost and prepare to go Clear again. The final image of Freddie, a refrain from the first scene, kills with a succinct poetry, but the last encounter between the two men—emotionally violent, absurd, and undeniably poignant—is a risky triumph. Dodd’s tearful serenade to Freddie speaks the sad truth of the aspiring mystic in the era of the organization man: there can be no such thing as a cult of one."  
— Kent Jones, “Battleship Mankind”, Film Comment, September-October 2012 [1]

The Master (Paul Thomas Anderson, 2012)

"As always with Anderson, the character opposition borders on the schematic, and the structure threatens to come apart at the seams. But the courting of danger is exactly what makes his films so exciting, this new film most of all. I don’t think he has ever done a better job of resolving his story, perhaps because he has come to terms with the irresolution within and between his characters. Freddie will always be Dodd’s guarantor of authenticity, and his bête noire as he tries to establish his financial empire. Dodd will always loom as Freddie’s savior and his greatest “enabler.” One imagines an eternal return: re-emerging from the lost to go Clear only to escape back to the lost and prepare to go Clear again. The final image of Freddie, a refrain from the first scene, kills with a succinct poetry, but the last encounter between the two men—emotionally violent, absurd, and undeniably poignant—is a risky triumph. Dodd’s tearful serenade to Freddie speaks the sad truth of the aspiring mystic in the era of the organization man: there can be no such thing as a cult of one."  

— Kent Jones, “Battleship Mankind”, Film Comment, September-October 2012 [1]

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notes
  1. ikaristwin reblogged this from filmghoul
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