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ariel esteban cayer


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Winter Kept Us Warm (David Secter, 1965)
Rare Canadian queer cinema gem, David Secter’s first film addresses (very quietly and subtly) the blooming romance between two male students at the university of Toronto in the very repressive climate of 60s Canadian campus life. Shot for virtually no money and widely autobiographical, the film was the first English-Canadian film to be invited to Cannes and is a known influence on David Cronenberg, who states, in Cronenberg on Cronenberg "Secter had somehow hustled together a feature film that was intriguing because it was completely unprecedented. And then the film appeared, and I was stunned. Shocked. Exhilarated."[1] The film is a testament to the possibilities of heartfelt filmmaking on a shoestring budget and beginner’s set of technical skills, which I’m sure prompted, amongst other stuff, Cronenberg to pursue Stereo 4 years later. If anything, an amazing document of student life in the 1960s, a highly recommended film I had the immense opportunity of watching a 16mm print of this Saturday at Blue Sunshine, with an introduction from Matthew Hays and teacher Thomas Waugh. 

Winter Kept Us Warm (David Secter, 1965)

Rare Canadian queer cinema gem, David Secter’s first film addresses (very quietly and subtly) the blooming romance between two male students at the university of Toronto in the very repressive climate of 60s Canadian campus life. Shot for virtually no money and widely autobiographical, the film was the first English-Canadian film to be invited to Cannes and is a known influence on David Cronenberg, who states, in Cronenberg on Cronenberg "Secter had somehow hustled together a feature film that was intriguing because it was completely unprecedented. And then the film appeared, and I was stunned. Shocked. Exhilarated."[1] The film is a testament to the possibilities of heartfelt filmmaking on a shoestring budget and beginner’s set of technical skills, which I’m sure prompted, amongst other stuff, Cronenberg to pursue Stereo 4 years later. If anything, an amazing document of student life in the 1960sa highly recommended film I had the immense opportunity of watching a 16mm print of this Saturday at Blue Sunshine, with an introduction from Matthew Hays and teacher Thomas Waugh. 

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notes
  1. filmghoul posted this