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ariel esteban cayer


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Law of Desire (Pedro Almodóvar, 1987)
Telling the story of a love triangle between a homosexual film director (Eusebio Poncela), his transsexual sister Tina (a wonderful Carmen Maura) and mysterious and possessive stalker Antonio (a very young Antonio Banderas), Almodóvar’s stunning La ley del deseo, part queer pastiche of Spanish soap operas, part pop art on film, part tragedy, explores repression of desire through a dizzying whirlwind of genres - touching upon melodrama, with hints of Italian crime films, all the while referencing a multitude of works of art - paintings, specifically - my subconscious and lack of knowledge of art history couldn’t exactly pinpoint but references my brain was fully aware of. It barely matters, though: Almodóvar’s embraces camp aesthetics beautifully and drenches every frame with expressive colors in what is ultimately an incredibly stimulating film in which nothing is quite certain. Tonal shifts are as wild as they are numerous, but the director’s  playful depiction of gender finds a cinematic language in this very purposefully confused display of imagery and colors - a painful reminder I need to get acquainted with the director’s work, past Volver (2006) and the great La piel que habito (2011).

Law of Desire (Pedro Almodóvar, 1987)

Telling the story of a love triangle between a homosexual film director (Eusebio Poncela), his transsexual sister Tina (a wonderful Carmen Maura) and mysterious and possessive stalker Antonio (a very young Antonio Banderas), Almodóvar’s stunning La ley del deseo, part queer pastiche of Spanish soap operas, part pop art on film, part tragedy, explores repression of desire through a dizzying whirlwind of genres - touching upon melodrama, with hints of Italian crime films, all the while referencing a multitude of works of art - paintings, specifically - my subconscious and lack of knowledge of art history couldn’t exactly pinpoint but references my brain was fully aware of. It barely matters, though: Almodóvar’s embraces camp aesthetics beautifully and drenches every frame with expressive colors in what is ultimately an incredibly stimulating film in which nothing is quite certain. Tonal shifts are as wild as they are numerous, but the director’s  playful depiction of gender finds a cinematic language in this very purposefully confused display of imagery and colors - a painful reminder I need to get acquainted with the director’s work, past Volver (2006) and the great La piel que habito (2011).

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